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How to Open a New Checking Account

How to Open a New Checking Account

If you search online for “open new checking account,” you might find some unfamiliar ways of banking. Many entities only have an online presence, and no brick and mortar locations where you can talk to an actual person. A community bank or credit union, on the other hand, has a presence in your community, hires local people as employees, and invests right back into local interests.

A community bank or credit union has all the accounts and services needed to easily conduct financial transactions, and most now make it easy to conduct banking business online. Often the basic account underlying the relationship is a checking account. While some customers appreciate the ability to write out a paper check, many others now use their checking account as a base of operations for conducting their financial business online. They may have payments made directly to a checking account, or use the checking account to set up automatic bill payments.

A big advantage of opening a new checking account with a community bank and credit union is that they make it easy for you. Often you can go right into a local branch office, complete the transaction within a very short period of time, and walk out with a pad of starter checks. Many community banks and credit unions pay interest on checking accounts, don’t charge fees, or offer special incentives for customers who open a new account. Some have special accounts for students or senior citizens, or offer to waive minimum balance requirements for a specific period of time.

When you open a checking account for personal use, you will need to provide some type of identification, such as a driver’s license. They will then ask for your name, birthday, Social Security number and address. At a credit union, you will also need to be a member of the community they serve. So quit searching online for “open new checking account,” and go to the local community bank or credit union that makes it easy for you.